Astronomers Find Magnetic Field on Distant Alien World

By: April Carson



The magnetic field's Importance


The planet's magnetic field deflects the solar wind, preventing the planet's atmosphere from being eroded and its water turned into oxygen and hydrogen. Water is heavier than pure hydrogen and, as a result of its lightness, is rapidly vented into space by gravity. Water would not be able to live on Earth without a magnetic field, therefore life could not develop. Scientists have now discovered an exoplanet with possible magnetic field – for the first time - however.


Is there an exoplanet with a magnetic field?


Scientists studied an exoplanet approximately 123 light-years away, known as HAT-P-11b, which is roughly the same size as Neptune. It may be compared in terms of size to Neptune. The planet was observed during six transits across the disk of its star's disk.


The existence of carbon ions, charged particles that interact with magnetic fields, was confirmed for the first time by astronomers. Given that our planet's primary protection is in the form of this field, the discovery of one on a distant world is a significant step forward in the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.


Because of what's known about life on other planets, scientists can reasonably infer that such a field may exist here. On the other side, the lack of indications of life would suggest that the magnetic field is not always one of the most important factors for habitability.


Characteristics


Researchers used three-dimensional modeling based on real-world data to examine the link between the magnetic field and solar wind at higher levels of the atmosphere. The magnetosphere, it turned out, was comparable to that of Earth.


The only distinction is that the open exoplanet is much closer to its star than our Earth is to the Sun. It's possible that this proximity is what gives HAT-P-11b its "tails" - hot stellar rays literally make the planet's upper atmosphere boil and evaporate, resulting in the creation of magnetosphere tails.


Furthermore, the metallicity of the planet was examined and was discovered to be surprisingly low. The abundance of elements that are heavier than helium and hydrogen is known as metallicity.


Comparison with Solar System planets


Let's compare HAT-P-11b to the planets in the Solar System. Take Saturn and Jupiter, for example – they are large, metallic objects with modest magnetic fields. On the other side of the spectrum, we have Neptune and Uranus – planets with tiny magnetic fields but a lot more metals.


Despite the small mass of HAT-P-11b – 8% of Jupiter's mass – it falls into the graph of mini-Jupiters rather than a Neptune-like planet, according to astronomers. And that is owing to the low metallicity and powerful magnetic field.


One of the major flaws with HAT-P-11b is that its low metal content runs counter to established planet formation theories. As a result, researchers want to continue their research and may perhaps return to the present theories on exoplanet formation. This object serves as a reminder that we still have far too much to learn about the cosmos.





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About the Blogger:


April Carson is the daughter of Billy Carson. She received her bachelor's degree in Social Sciences from Jacksonville University, where she was also on the Women's Basketball team. She now has a successful clothing company that specializes in organic baby clothes and other items. Take a look at their most popular fall fashions on bossbabymav.com


To read more of April's blogs, check out her website! She publishes new blogs on a daily basis, including the most helpful mommy advice and baby care tips! Follow on IG @bossbabymav


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